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Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 52 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published in the last ten years that discuss breastfeeding promotion.

The MCH Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 52 records.
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Kuyper E, Vitta B, Dewey K. 2014. Implications of cesarean delivery for breastfeeding outcomes and strategies for breastfeeding support. Washington, DC: Alive & Thrive, 9 pp. (Insight. A&T technical brief 8. February 2014.)

Contact: Alive & Thrive, FHI 360, 1825 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 884-8754 Fax: (202) 464-3966 E-mail: aliveandthrive@fhi360.org Web Site: http://www.aliveandthrive.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Cesarean section

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Schanler RJ, Krebs NF, Mass SB, eds. 2014. Breastfeeding handbook for physicians (2nd ed). Washington, DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 320 pp.

Annotation: This book provides health care professionals and students in all specialties with a teaching and reference aid to enhance their knowledge of breastfeeding physiology and clinical practice to encourage and support breastfeeding. Topics include the rationale for promoting breastfeeding, composition of human milk, anatalomy and physiology of lactation, managing breastfeeding before and after conception, peripartum care, postpartum care in the hospital and at home, infant and mother m=breastfeeding maintenance, supoorting breastfeeding during mother-infant separation, lactation support, medications and breastfeeding, contraception, and breastfeeding and preterm infants and other special circumstances. Appendices provide resources and professional position statements on breastfeeding.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 141 Northwest Point Boulevard, Elk Grove Village, IL 60007-1098, Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: http://www.aap.org Document Number: ISBN 978-1-58110-804-0.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child nutrition, Complementary feeding, Health promotion, Infant feeding, Infant nutrition, Lactation, Lactation management, Maternal health, Resources for professionals

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Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2013. Worksite wellness in state health agencies: Implementation of healthy maternity policies. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 1 video (59 min., 41 sec.).

Annotation: This webinar highlights successful strategies and best practices that have been implemented in Nevada and North Dakota state health agencies to encourage breastfeeding and to help new parents return to work. In addition, the Virginia breastfeeding coordinator describes how the Virginia Department of Health has worked with businesses to develop breastfeeding policies.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Model programs, State initiatives, Workplace

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. Strategies to prevent obesity and other chronic diseases: The CDC guide to strategies to support breastfeeding mothers and babies. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 52 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides state and local community members with information to help them choose the breastfeeding intervention strategy that best meets needs, including hospitals and birth centers, worksites, and communities. This guide builds upon the research evidence demonstrating effective intervention strategies and offers relevant information for each including program examples and resources. Contents include maternity care practices, professional education, access to professional support, peer support programs, support for breastfeeding in the workplace and in early care and education, access to breastfeeding education and information, social marketing, and addressing the marketing of infant formula.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdc@cdcinfo.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the web site.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Intervention, Lactation, Lactation management, MCH programs, Professional education, Resources for professionals

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HealthConnect One, Illinois Department of Human Services, University of Illinois School of Public Health. 2013. Illinois breastfeeding blueprint: A plan for change. [no city, IL]: HealthConnect One, Illinois Department of Human Services, University of Illinois School of Public Health, 32 pp.

Annotation: This document, which is focused on the importance of breastfeeding and breastfeeding promotion, describes a plan for changing breastfeeding practices in Illinois. The document discusses the evidence base for breastfeeding, including benefits for mothers, psychosocial benefits, and benefits for families and communities. Illinois breastfeeding data are also presented.

Contact: Illinois Breastfeeding Blueprint, E-mail: http://www.ilbreastfeedingblueprint.org/pages/contact_us/12.php Web Site: http://www.ilbreastfeedingblueprint.org/ Available from the web site.

Keywords: State surveys, Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Communities, Families, Illinois, Infant health, Mental health, Statistical data, Women's health

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Kaiser Permanente Care Management Institue. 2013. Improving hospital breastfeeding support: Implementation toolkit. Oakland, CA: Kaiser Permanente Care Management Institue, 103 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit, which contains information about breastfeeding promotion in the inpatient setting, is designed to assist health care organizations and hospital teams in planning and implementing performance-improvement projects. The toolkit is organized around five primary components of performance improvement in hospital-based breastfeeding support: leadership engagement, planning and ongoing improvement, measurement strategy, keeping patients at the center, and sustainability. The toolkit provides information on evidence for breastfeeding benefits, Kaiser Parmanente's journey, building for successful change, and innovative ideas for breastfeeding support and promotion.

Contact: Kaiser Permanente Case Management Institute, 1 Kaiser Plaza, 16L, Oakland, CA 94612, E-mail: cmi.communications@kp.org Web Site: http://kpcmi.org Available from the web site.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Hospital programs, Infant health, Leadership, Program improvement, Women's health

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Lactation Education Accreditation and Approval Review Committee. 2013. Curriculum for a lactation program. Morrisville, NC: Lactation Education Accreditation and Approval Review Committee, 32 pp.

Annotation: This curriculum presents competencies and objectives to guide any lactation program, regardless of setting. Topics include communication and counseling; documentation and communication; history taking and assessment; prenatal and perinatal breastfeeding support; extended breastfeeding support; problem-solving skills; newborn/child breastfeeding challenges; maternal breastfeeding challenges' use of techniques and devices; public health; research, legislation, and policy; professional responsibilities and practice; and leadership and teaching. For each topic, information is provided about core competencies, learning objectives, suggested content, and suggested skills and behaviors. [Record in process]

Contact: Lactation Education Accreditation and Approval Review Committee, 2501 Aerial Center Parkway, Suite 103, Morrisville, NC 27560, Telephone: (919) 459-6106 E-mail: info@leaarc.org Web Site: http://www.leaarc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Breastfeeding support, Lactation, Leadership, Legislation, Parent support services, Public health, Public policy, Research, Standards

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Los Angeles County Public Health Department . 2013. Hospital practices: Can they impact breastfeeding?. Los Angeles, CA: Los Angeles County Public Health Department , 8 pp. (LA health)

Annotation: This report presents findings from the 2011 Los Angeles County Health Survey (LACHS) of breastfeeding-related hospital practices and explains how hospital practices can influence breastfeeding outcomes and how breastfeeding benefits both mothers and babies. It also provides a 10-step breastfeeding initiative for hospitals; lists the Healthy People 2020 goals for breastfeeding; and presents statistics from the LACHS on hospital practices and breastfeeding initiation and duration based on the mothers' age, race and ethnicity, education, and poverty level.Included are recommended actions for mothers and families, cities and communities, the health care community, employers, and policy makers. A summary of what Los Angeles County has been doing to advance breastfeeding in hospitals is also provided.

Contact: Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, 313 North Figueroa Street, Room 127, Los Angeles, CA 90012, Telephone: (213) 240-7785 Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Hospital programs, Hospitals, Outcome evaluation, Statistics, Surveys

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Mullen C. 2013. State opportunities and strategies for breastfeeding promotion through the Affordable Care Act. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, National Center on Health Reform Implementation, 12 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief explores how states and communities can capitalize on the opportunities presented by the Affordable Care Act to advance breastfeeding. In particular, it examines state partnerships; financing of breastfeeding support and counseling services; promoting worksite accommodations; and using the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting program to improve referral and tracking. The brief also highlights some of the best practices of state Title V maternal and child health programs and their partners and offers strategies for states interested in developing similar efforts.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2030 M Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 775-0061 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Financing, Health care reform, Home visiting, Model programs, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Public private partnerships, State MCH programs, Workplace

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National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality . 2013. Becoming baby-friendly: Improving breastfeeding support in US hospitals. [Boston, MA]: National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality , 1 video (16 min., 47 sec.).

Annotation: This video presents the stories of four hospitals as they journey toward Baby-Friendly status. The video was produced as part of the Best Fed Beginnings quality-improvement project, a nationwide effort to help hospitals improve maternity care and increase the number of Baby-Friendly hospitals in the United States. The video features the Barnes-Jewish Hospital's (Missouri) work on patient-centered care, the Presbyterian Hospital's (New Mexico) efforts to increase skin-to-skin contact, the Christiana Hospital's (Delaware) focus on staff buy-in, and the University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital's efforts to catalyze the community by changing misconceptions about breastfeeding.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Communities, Hospital programs, Infant health, Newborn infants, Quality assurance, Reproductive health, Women's health

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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health. 2013. It's only natural: Mother's love, mother's milk. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health,

Annotation: This website offers information to help African-American new mothers and their families understand the benefits of breastfeeding, make breastfeeding work, and get the support they need to breastfeed their infants.Topics include planning ahead, breastfeeding myths, overcoming challenges, finding support, and fitting breastfeeding into women's lives. One woman's breastfeeding story is also presented, and links to related information are included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 712E, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 690-7650 Fax: (202) 205-2631 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the web site.

Keywords: Blacks, Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Consumer education materials, Families, Infant health, Mothers, Parent support services, Public awareness campaigns, Women's health

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UNICEF, the United Nation's Children's Fund. 2013. Breastfeeding on the worldwide agenda: Findings from a landscape analysis on political commitment for programmes to protect, promote and support breastfeeding. New York, NY: UNICEF, the United Nation's Children's Fund, 79 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about an analysis to assess the political commitment to and priority for breastfeeding interventions globally and in selected countries to determine the need for and potential benefits of a targeted initiative to enhance leadership and advocacy. The report discusses evidence, policies, and strategic frameworks for breastfeeding, including a summary of global evidence on breastfeeding, policy bases for breastfeeding, and commitment to breastfeeding. Key findings from a stakeholder survey are also presented.

Contact: UNICEF, the United Nation's Children's Fund, UNICEF House, Three United Nations Plaza, 44th Street, Between 1st and 2nd Avenues, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 326-7000 Fax: (212) 887-7465 Web Site: http://www.unicef.org Available from the web site.

Keywords: Advocacy, Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Initiatives, International health, Intervention, Leadership, Research, Surveys

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United States Breastfeeding Committee. 2013. Implementing the Joint Commission perinatal care core measure on exclusive breast milk feeding (2nd rev. ed.). Washington, DC: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 40 pp.

Annotation: This publication is designed to aid hospitals and maternity facilities in complying with the Joint Commission's exclusive breast milk feeding core measure. Contents include guidelines for data collection and recommendations for documentation including charting samples. The publication also provides information on implementing evidence-based practices that improve exclusive breast milk feeding. Topics include labor and delivery care, postpartum care, facility discharge care, staff training, structural and organizational aspects of care delivery. Additional resources are available from the website. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 2025 M Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 367-1132 Fax: (202) 367-2132 E-mail: office@usbreastfeeding.org Web Site: http://www.usbreastfeeding.org Available from the web site.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Data collection, Evidence-based health care, Guideline adherence, Measures, Perinatal care, Program improvement, Quality assurance

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [2012]. Doctors in action: A call to action from the Surgeon General to support breastfeeding. [Atlanta, GA]: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet explains how physicians and other health professionals can support breastfeeding in clinical care practices. It describes how doctors can support their patients' intentions to breastfeed; provide best practices guidelines and breastfeeding support; avoid serving as advertisers for infant formula; develop skilled lactation care teams; and help create health care systems that guarantee continuity of skilled support for lactation between hospitals and health care settings in the community. Included are key actions steps identified by the Surgeon General to support breastfeeding in clinical care and a call for changes in clinical care practices that promote breastfeeding.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdc@cdcinfo.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion campaigns, Family support, Health care systems, Lactation management, Physicians, Public health

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [2012]. Health care leadership in action: A call to action from the Surgeon General to support breastfeeding. [Atlanta, GA]: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet explains how to support breastfeeding in health care systems by improving maternity care practices, providing breastfeeding support after hospital discharge, improving clinician knowledge and skills, including breastfeeding support as a standard of care, and developing skilled lactation care teams. Included are key actions steps identified by the Surgeon General to support breastfeeding in health care systems and a call for changes in health care that promote breastfeeding.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdc@cdcinfo.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion campaigns, Health care systems, Public health

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [2012]. Nurses in action: A call to action from the Surgeon General to support breastfeeding. [Atlanta, GA]: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet explains how nurses can help breastfeeding mothers in clinical care practices. It describes how nurses can support mothers' intentions to breastfeed; promote breastfeeding as a standard of care; seek out opportunities to improve knowledge and skills; develop skilled lactation care teams. and provide breastfeeding support after hospital discharge. Included are key actions steps identified by the Surgeon General to support breastfeeding in clinical care and a call for changes in clinical care practices that promote breastfeeding.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdc@cdcinfo.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion campaigns, Family support, Health care systems, Lactation management, Nurse clinicians, Physicians, Public health

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United Methodist Health Ministry Fund. 2012-. High 5 for mom & baby. Hutchinson, KS: United Methodist Health Ministry Fund, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource provides information on the importance of breastfeeding and the role of hospitals in breastfeeding success. It describes a program to encourage adoption of five evidence based maternity care practices that have been found to increase breastfeeding rates. Contents include current breastfeeding rates in Kansas, participating hospitals, endorsements, a hospital application agreement and form, and program logos and branding materials.

Contact: United Methodist Health Ministry Fund, P.O. Box 1384, 100 East First, Hutchinson, KS 67504-1384, Telephone: (800) 369-7191 Secondary Telephone: (316) 662-8586 E-mail: healthfund@healthfund.org Web Site: http://www.healthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Evidence based medicine, Health promotion, Hospital accreditation, Infant health, Kansas, Maternal health, Model programs, State programs

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Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2012. Health reform: What is in it to promote breastfeeding?. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet outlines breastfeeding provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and discusses how maternal and child health programs can use the ACA to strengthen breastfeeding efforts for women. Topics include breastfeeding support, counseling, and equipment, as well as reasonable break time and appropriate space in the workplace. Sources and selected resources for further information are provided.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2030 M Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 775-0061 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Health care reform, Legislation, State MCH programs, Women, Working mothers, Workplace health promotion

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Meek JY. 2012. Breastfeeding support and promotion [speaker's kit] (rev.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, Section on Breastfeeding,

Annotation: This kit is designed for educating pediatricians, physicians; public health workers; nurses; hospital, clinic, or private practice staff; dentists; and others on the topic of breastfeeding support and promotion. The content is presented in five sections, each of which contains presentation slides and notes. Topics include the benefits, process, management, and advocacy of breastfeeding.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 141 Northwest Point Boulevard, Elk Grove Village, IL 60007-1098, Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Contact E-mail: lactation@aap.org Web Site: http://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs

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U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2011. The Surgeon General's call to action to support breastfeeding. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 88 pp., exec. summ. (4 pp.).

Annotation: This report describes steps that mothers and their families, communities, clinicians, employers, researchers, and government leaders can take to participate in a society-wide approach to support mothers and babies who are breastfeeding. Topics include the importance of breastfeeding, rates of breastfeeding, and barriers to breastfeeding in the United States. Recommended actions and their associated implementation strategies are detailed.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Breastfeeding promotion, Community action, Infant feeding, Infant nutrition, Lactation management, National initiatives, Public health infrastructure, Public policy, Public private partnerships

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United States Breastfeeding Committee. 2011. Strategic plan: 2009-2013. Rockville, MD: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 3 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the strategic plan of the United States Breastfeeding Committee (USBC) to promote breastfeeding in the United States. It contains sections on the mission and vision of the USBC and details specific goals. These goals are: to ensure that quality breastfeeding services are an essential component of health care for all families, to reduce marketing that undermines optimal breastfeeding, to increase protection, promotion and support for breastfeeding mothers in the workforce, and to ensure the sustainability and effectiveness of the USBC. Strategies for each goal are provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 2025 M Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 367-1132 Fax: (202) 367-2132 E-mail: office@usbreastfeeding.org Web Site: http://www.usbreastfeeding.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Infant health, Infant nutrition, Strategic plans

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Whitacre PT, Moats S; Institute of Medicine. 2011. Updating the USDA National Breastfeeding Campaign: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 114 pp.

Annotation: This document presents presentations and discussions from a workshop held to provide input on how to effectively build on the successes of the national breastfeeding support and promotion campaign, Loving Support Makes Breastfeeding Work, launched in 1997. The workshop focused on using an evidence-based social marketing strategiy to make the campaign relevant and effective. The document summarizes opening remarks from the president of the National WIC Association; discusses changes over the past 15 years; describes lessons learned from other public health campaigns; and discusses suggestions for moving the social marketing campaign forward, including program components and messages, communication tools, implementation tools for state WIC programs, strategic community-based partnerships, identification of research gaps, and evaluation of program success.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu $38.75 plus shipping and handling; also available from the web site. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-21919-8.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Communication, Community programs, Program evaluation, Public awareness campaigns, Research, WIC Program

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Collins A, Rappaport CD, Burstein N. 2010. WIC breastfeeding peer counseling study: Final implementation report. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, Office of Research and Analysis, 274 pp. (Special nutrition programs report no. WIC-10-BPC)

Annotation: This report discusses a study of the Loving Support Peer Counseling Program, an initiative designed to increase breastfeeding initiation and duration rates for WIC participants and to increase community support for WIC participants who breastfeed. The report focuses on the implementation component of the study; an impact component is also being developed. The report summarizes information collected through a Web-based survey on how states, Indian tribal organizations, and territories (ITOT) implement peer counseling programs using the Loving Support model to understand how Loving Support peer counseling is being used at the state and ITOT levels. The report describes the general characteristics of local WIC agencies (LWAs) implementing the program and compares them to those that are not currently implementing it. The report also summarizes information about Loving Support Peer Counseling Program operations from 40 LWAs selected to represent LWAs that implement the program. The report concludes with five local case studies of the Loving Support Peer Counseling Program.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Case studies, Initiatives, Local programs, Peer counseling, Program evaluation, Programs, State programs, WIC program

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United States Breastfeeding Committee. 2010. Core competencies in breastfeeding care and services for all health professionals (rev. ed.). Washington, DC: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 8 pp.

Annotation: This report presents core competencies in breastfeeding care and service that provide health professionals with a guideline and framework to integrate evidence-based breastfeeding knowledge, skills, and attitudes into their standard health care deliver practices. The report presents the minimum knowledge, skills, and attitudes that all health professionals need to have in order to provide care that protects, promotes, and supports breastfeeding and also presents a more comprehensive list of core competencies in these three areas. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 2025 M Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 367-1132 Fax: (202) 367-2132 E-mail: office@usbreastfeeding.org Web Site: http://www.usbreastfeeding.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Attitudes, Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Competence, Knowledge level

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United States Breastfeeding Committee. 2010. Implementing the Joint Commission on Perinatal Care core measure on exclusive breast milk feeding. Washington, DC: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report explains how hospitals and maternity facilities can implement the core measure on exclusive breast milk feeding which is one of the Perinatal Care core measures that replaced The Joint Commission's Pregnancy and Related Conditions core measures set beginning in April 2010. The report provides guidelines to help health professionals achieve compliance with the new measure by collecting data that supports exclusive breast milk feeding, defined by The Joint Commission as "a newborn receiving only breast milk and no other liquids or solids except for drops or syrups." It explains how compliance may require facilities to modify their paper charts and/or electronic medical records and includes examples from exemplary hospitals that already collect data on exclusive breast milk feeding.

Contact: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 2025 M Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 367-1132 Fax: (202) 367-2132 E-mail: office@usbreastfeeding.org Web Site: http://www.usbreastfeeding.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Data collection, Guidelines, Hospital accreditation, Measures, Standards

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United States Breastfeeding Committee. 2010. Workplace accommodations to support and protect breastfeeding. Washington, DC: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 20 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides a background for understanding the role of lactation breaks in the workplace as a critical way to improve the health and productivity of working women and their children, in compliance with Section 4207 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Section topics include the public health case; how lactation breaks support the physical process of maintaining milk supply; lactation breaks in the context of other work-family and workplace wellness issues and explores the business case for breastfeeding; U.S. laws about breastfeeding and the workplace; and looks ahead to unfinished business. The appendix offers a quick look at the history of infant feeding and women’s work, in order to provide context for decision-makers in government and business.

Contact: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 2025 M Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 367-1132 Fax: (202) 367-2132 E-mail: office@usbreastfeeding.org Web Site: http://www.usbreastfeeding.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Infant health, Infant nutrition, Maternal health, Working mothers

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Valrose J, Dillon K, Schauben L, Alizaga N. 2010. Breastfeeding supports and challenges: Mothers' perspectives on healthcare, worksites and social influences. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health, Physical Activity and Nutrition Program and Wilder Research, 59 pp.

Annotation: This report describes findings from focus groups and interviews with a diverse cross section of mothers of infants in MInnesota. The research -- conducted by the Minnesota Department of Health’s Physical Activity and Nutrition Unit and Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Program in partnership with Wilder Research -- is based on questions that centered on the supports for and challenges of breastfeeding infants, particularly in relation to their experiences with health care settings, worksites, and social influences. The report discusses the characteristics of participants; their perceived knowledge of infant feeding; the knowledge and influence of health care providers; and worksite support and other social influences for infant feeding; Included are a summary of findings among specific populations (Native American women; Latina women; Somali women; Hmong women; and women with low levels of education). Recommendations are included.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, P.O. Box 64975, St. Paul, MN 55164-0975, Telephone: (651) 201-5000 Secondary Telephone: (888) 345-0823 Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Focus groups, Infant feeding, Interviews, Minnesota, Research, State initiatives

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U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children. [2009] (ca.). Partnering with WIC for breastfeeding success. Washington, DC: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, 2 items.

Annotation: This breastfeeding promotion kit includes a booklet and 7-minute video to help health professinals and other stakeholders partner with WIC to create a national environment that encourages mothers to breastfeed. The video explains how new mothers need a network of support to continue breasffeeding successfully and how the WIC program is working to promote breastfeeding. The video includes breastfeeding experiences shared by WIC mothers and their partners. The booklet discusses the physical and emotional benefits of breastfeeding for infants, mothers, and families and describes how WIC is reaching out to community partners to build a network of support.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 520, Alexandria, VA 22302, Telephone: (703) 305-2746 Fax: (703_ 305-2196 Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/wic/ Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Videos, WIC Program

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U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children. [2009] (ca.). Using loving support to grow and glow in WIC: Breastfeeding training for local WIC staff. Washington, DC: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children,

Annotation: This training curriculum was developed to help ensure that all staff attain a level of proficiency in the skills required to promote and support breastfeeding within a WIC (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children) setting. The competencies covered in the individual training modules are designed to help staff address questions, conduct assessments, individually tailor food packages that enable mothers to breastfeed exclusively, and provide support to help mothers meet their breastfeeding goals. The curriculum reinforces the message that staff working within a WIC setting play an important role as part of the family’s circle of care.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 520, Alexandria, VA 22302, Telephone: (703) 305-2746 Fax: (703_ 305-2196 Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/wic/ Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding support, Professional training, Training materials, WIC program

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United States Breastfeeding Committee. [2009]. Breastfeeding: A vital emergency response. Are you ready?. Washington, DC: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet gives information that highlights the importance of breastfeeding to infant health during an emergency and advises relief organizations and health care providers on how they can support breastfeeding before and during an emergency. The fact sheet lists links to several organizations that can provide more information and resources.

Contact: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 2025 M Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 367-1132 Fax: (202) 367-2132 E-mail: office@usbreastfeeding.org Web Site: http://www.usbreastfeeding.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Educational materials, Emergencies

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U.S. Food and Nutrition Service. [2008]. Partnering with WIC for breastfeeding success. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 1 CD-ROM, 1 booklet (5 pp.).

Annotation: This CD-ROM illustrates how the WIC program supports and promotes breastfeeding through peer counseling programs, breastfeeding classes, and other efforts. The 8 minute video features testimony from WIC medical professionals and consumers enrolled in the WIC program and invites other organizations to partner with WIC.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Single photocopies available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion programs, WIC program

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Baxter K, Danoff N, Haw A, O'Hara M, Pessl M, Stuart D, Wall G. 2008. Increasing breastfeeding success: Why it matters and what the research shows. Seattle, WA: Breastfeeding Coalition of Washington and Physician Lactation Education Collaborative of Washington, 2 CD-ROMs.

Annotation: This CD set was written by leading physicians and International Board Certified Lactation Consultants from Washington state to provide tools for physicians and their staff to learn about and discuss ways of integrating evidence-based research into practice. The first disk provides foundations about breastfeeding. Disk two focuses on breastfeeding problems, challenges, support, and troubleshooting. Ten different lactation topics are discussed and each topic includes a slide presentation, slide notes, presentation outline, learning objectives and purpose, references, and discussion questions.

Contact: Breastfeeding Coalition of Washington, 155 North East 100th Street, #500, Seattle, WA 98125, Telephone: (206) 281-8032 Fax: (206) 270-8891 E-mail: rachels@wihtinreachwa.org Web Site: http://www.breastfeedingwa.org/ $23.00 for orders outside of Washington state; free in-state..

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Breastfeeding, CD-ROMs, Infant nutrition, Lactation, Resources for professionals

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California WIC Association and University of California Davis Human Lactation Center. 2008. Depends on where you were born: California hospitals must close the gap in exclusive breastfeeding rates. Sacramento, CA: California WIC Association; Davis, CA: University of California Davis Human Lactation Center, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report examines how policies directly influence breastfeeding behaviors It summarizes how breastfeeding affects infant and mother health, where and how some hospitals are lagging in encouraging breastfeeding, and where and how California hospitals can improve supports for breastfeeding.

Contact: California WIC Association, 1107 Ninth Street, Suite 625, Sacramento, CA 95814, Telephone: (916) 448-2280 Fax: (916) 448-7826 E-mail: ltrue@calwic.org Web Site: http://www.calwic.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, California, Hospitals

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Clark H, McDonald M, Morrow B, Harrison L, PRAMS Working Group. 2008. PRAMS and breastfeeding [rev. ed.]. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the importance of breastfeeding and the survey of women on breastfeeding initiation and current breastfeeding, presents an overview of the data on prevalence at various intervals postpartum, and provides recommendations on the use of data to identify states and groups of women with low prevalence of breastfeeding.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 3033, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (800) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-6450 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/prams/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Infant feeding, Newborn infants, PRAMS, Statistical data, Surveys

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McDowell MM, Wang C-Y, Kennedy-Stephenson J. 2008. Breastfeeding in the United States: Findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 1999-2006. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 8 pp. (NCHS data brief, no. 5)

Annotation: This report summarizes information on breastfeeding rates in the United States based on data from the 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The following topics are discussed: (1) have breastfeeding rates in the United States changed over time? (2) Are children from some population subgroups more likely to be breastfed than others? (3) Do breastfeeding rates differ by other sociodemographic characteristics? and (4) Has there been a change in the United States in the proportion of infants who are still breastfed at age 6 months? A summary, definitions, data sources and methods, and references are provided. Statistics information is presented in figures throughout the report.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Breastfeeding, Economic factors, Infant health, Nutrition, Racial factors, Statistics, Trends

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National Conference of State Legislatures. 2008. 50 state summary of breastfeeding laws. [Upd. ed.]. Denver, CO: National Conference of State Legislatures, 10 pp.

Annotation: This summary provides information on state laws with language specifically allowing women to breastfeed in any public or private location, in the workplace, exempting breastfeeding mothers from jury duty, or have implemented or encouraged the development of a breastfeeding awareness education campaign, as well as other laws unique to individual states. Legislative codes are cited in each entry along with a brief summary.

Contact: National Conference of State Legislatures, 7700 East First Place, Denver, CO 80230, Telephone: (303) 364-7700 Fax: (303) 364-7800 Web Site: http://www.ncsl.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, State legislation

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United States Breastfeeding Committee. 2008. Achieving exclusive breastfeeding in the United States: Findings and recommendations. Washington, DC: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report about exclusive breastfeeding provides information on what exclusive breastfeeding is, why it is important, and who supports it; discusses U.S. rates and trends; presents three areas of influence that have been identified as presenting obstacles and constraints to exclusive breastfeeding (the health care system and health professionals; social, economic, and political factors; and media and marketing practices); discusses methods for selection of materials for the literature review; and presents findings. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 2025 M Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 367-1132 Fax: (202) 367-2132 E-mail: office@usbreastfeeding.org Web Site: http://www.usbreastfeeding.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Attitudes, Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Economic factors, Health care, Infant health, Mass media, Research, Social factors, Women's health

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National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2007-2013. Breastfeeding report card, United States. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 4 pp.

Annotation: This annual report provides perspectives on state and national trends in breastfeeding. Topics include breastfeeding rates from the U.S. National Immunization Survey, birth facility support, mother-to-mother support, professional support, infrastructure, and support in child care settings. Each report contains information on what's new since the release of the first report in 2007, as well as information on how states can use the report card to improve breastfeeding rates. State-by-state data tables are included.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available from the web site.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Hospitals, Legislation, Measures, Parent support services, State programs, Statistical data

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Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses, Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline Team. 2007. Breastfeeding support: Prenatal care through the first year (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses, 89 pp., plus 4 pp. Quick Care Guide. (Evidence-based clinical practice guideline)

Annotation: This document contains guidelines outlining evidence-based assessment and intervention parameters designed to assist health care providers who care for breastfeeding mothers and their infants, women who are considering breast-feeding, or those who are planning to breastfeed. The guidelines provide information to support and guide women during the preconception, prenatal, and postpartum periods. Topics include trends in breastfeeding, the benefits to both infant and mother, breastfeeding promotion, and management and research in breastfeeding, and benefits to vulnerable and preterm infants. References are provided along with a continuing nursing education credit application, post test questions, and a participant evaluation form.

Contact: Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses, 2000 L Street, N.W., Suite 740, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 261-2400 Secondary Telephone: (800) 673-8499 Fax: (202) 728-0575 E-mail: customerservice@awhonn.org Web Site: http://www.awhonn.org/awhonn/ $53.95 for non-members, $34.95 for AWHONN members, plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Continuing education, Guidelines, Infant health, Maternal health, Nursing education, Resources for professionals, Trends

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International Lactation Consultant Association. 2006. Standards of practice for international board certified lactation consultants. [3rd ed.]. Raleigh, NC: International Lactation Consultant Association, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet outlines standards of practice for individuals certified by the International Lactation Consultant Association to assure quality practice and service to clients, families, and other health care professionals. It address four areas: (1) professional responsibilities, (2) legal considerations, (3) clinical practice, and (4) breastfeeding education and counseling.

Contact: International Lactation Consultant Association, 2501 Aerial Center Parkway, Suite 103, Morrisville, NC 27560, Telephone: (919) 861-5577 Fax: (919) 459-2075 E-mail: info@ilca.org Web Site: http://www.ilca.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Lactation, Lactation specialists, Nutrition counseling, Professional education, Professional training, Resources for professionals

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Mason G, Roholt S (Eds.). 2006. Promoting, protecting and supporting breastfeeding: A North Carolina blueprint for action. Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Division of Public Health, Nutrition Services Branch, ca. 100 pp.

Annotation: This blueprint, which provides information on the importance of breastfeeding for both mothers and infants, incorporates input from a broad spectrum of community, state, and national stakeholders and experts and is intended to serve as a guide for North Carolina communities, health care systems, professional societies, academic and training programs, workplaces, and child care facilities to support, promote, and protect breastfeeding. The document discusses benefits to and barriers of breastfeeding, provides recommendations, and discusses ways to translate recommendations into action.

Contact: North Carolina Division of Public Health, Nutrition Services Branch, 1914 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-1914, Telephone: (919) 707-5799 Fax: (919) 870-4818 Web Site: http://www.nutritionnc.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Child health, Infant health, Mothers, North Carolina, State initiatives, Women's health, Working mothers

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U.S. General Accountability Office. 2006. Breastfeeding: Some strategies used to market infant formula may discourage breastfeeding; State contracts should better protect against misuse of WIC name. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accountability Office, 40 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the findings of a Congressionally requested study to review the potential impact of infant formula marketing on breastfeeding rates, especially for infants in the WIC (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children) program. Topics include an estimate of breastfeeding rates for infants in the general population and for infants on WIC, and how these rates compare to recommended breastfeeding rates; how infant formula is marketed to women in general and to women on WIC in particular; and what is known about the impact of infant formula marketing. Topics also include the benefits of breastfeeding, WIC and infant formula, efforts to limit formula advertising, breastfeeding trends, and formula marketing and the use of WIC trademarks. Conclusions and an agency recommendation are provided along with appendices on advertising data and a literature review.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: GAO-06-282.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Infant feeding, Infant formula, Infant nutrition, Marketing, WIC program

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American Academy of Pediatrics, Section on Breastfeeding. 2005. Breastfeeding and the use of human milk. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, Section on Breastfeeding, 11 pp.

Annotation: This revised policy statement cites substantial new research on the importance of breastfeeding and sets forth principles to guide pediatricians and other health professionals in assisting women and children in the initiation and maintenance of breastfeeding. It includes information on child, maternal, and community health benefits of breastfeeding; contraindications to breastfeeding; recommendations on breastfeeding for healthy term infants and high-risk infants; and the role of pediatricians and other health professionals in protecting, promoting, and supporting breastfeeding. The policy statement emphasizes the central role of the pediatrician in coordinating breastfeeding management and providing a medical home for the child. The statement lists members of the Section on Breastfeeding and extensive references.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 141 Northwest Point Boulevard, Elk Grove Village, IL 60007-1098, Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: http://www.aap.org Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Health policy, Health promotion, Infant feeding, Pediatricians, Primary care, Public policy, Role

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Inland Empire Breastfeeding Coalition and Inland Counties Regional Perinatal Program. 2005. Providing breastfeeding support: Model hospital policy recommendations. (3rd ed.). Sacramento, CA: California Department of Health Services, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health, 45 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides model hospital hospital recommendations for providing breastfeeding support to new mothers. The paper includes a list of ten policy recommendations that are designed to give basic information and guidance to perinatal professionals who wish to revise policies that affect breastfeeding mothers. Following the list is an expanded explanation of each recommendation, including information on intervention and management, rationales, and references.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, MS 8305, P.O. Box 997420, Sacramento, CA 95899-7420, Telephone: (866) 241-0395 Fax: (916) 650-0305 E-mail: mchinet@cdph.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/MCAH/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Guidelines, Hospitals, Infant health, Newborns, Nutrition policy

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Shealy KR, Li R, Benton-Davis S, Grummer-Strawn LM. 2005. The CDC guide to breastfeeding interventions. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity, 67 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides state and local community members with information to help them choose a breastfeeding intervention that best meets their needs. Included in the guide are all types of breastfeeding interventions that have been received by the Cochrane Collaboration and published through the Cochrane Library. The chapters in the guide are divided into two sections based on evidence for effectiveness. In the first section, the evidence is significant; in the second, it is limited. Section 1 includes the following categories: (1) maternity care practices, support for breastfeeding in the workplace, (3) peer support, (4) educating mothers, (5) professional support, and (6) media and social marketing. Section 2 includes the following categories:(1) countermarketing and the WHO International Code, (2) professional education, (3) public acceptance, and (4) hotlines and other information resources. A list of references is included. The guide includes two appendices: (1) expert panel and (2) glossary.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdc@cdcinfo.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Education, Evidence based medicine, Hotlines, Interventions, Literature reviews, Marketing, Peer support programs, Working mothers

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Weimer DR. 2005. Breastfeeding: Federal legislation. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, 10 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes federal laws enacted concerning breastfeeding, including breastfeeding promotion and breastfeeding in federal buildings and on federal property, and briefly examines current legislative proposals concerning breastfeeding. Proposed legislation introduced in the 108th and 109th Congresses is reviewed. The report includes footnotes.

Contact: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, 101 Independence Avenue, S.E., Washington, DC 20540-7500, Fax: Web Site: http://www.loc.gov/crsinfo Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Federal legislation

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Wellstart International. 2005. Infant and young child feeding in emergency situations. [Rev. upd. ed.]. [San Diego, CA]: Wellstart International, 3 pp.

Annotation: This brief discusses the importance of continuing breastfeeding during emergencies as it may be the only sustainable element of food security for infants and young children. It addresses the following topics: breastfeeding during mother's stress or malnourishment, redeveloping the milk supply, and providing specific assistance to breastfeeding women. Additional information is provided about human milk substitutes and optimal feeding practices in emergencies. A chart illustrates a triage approach to decision-making for feeding infants under six months during emergencies.

Contact: Wellstart International, P.O. Box 80877, San Diego, CA 92138-0877, Telephone: (619) 295-5192 Fax: (619) 574-8159 E-mail: info@wellstart.org Web Site: http://www.wellstart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Consumer education, Emergencies, Emergency child care, Food supply, Infant feeding, Infants, Lactation management, Young children

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Chien D. [2004]. State legislation that protects, promotes, and supports breastfeeding: An inventory and analysis of state breastfeeding and maternity leave legislation. Raleigh, NC: U.S. Breastfeeding Committee, 42 pp.

Annotation: This paper lists and analyzes state legislation that protects, promotes, and supports breastfeeding. Part 1 discusses state breastfeeding legislation. Part 2 discusses state maternity leave legislation. The paper includes appendices: a state-by-state list of enacted breastfeeding legislation (summarized), a state-by-state list of enacted breastfeeding legislation (by category), and a table showing an analysis of legislation broken down by category.

Contact: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 2025 M Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 367-1132 Fax: (202) 367-2132 E-mail: office@usbreastfeeding.org Web Site: http://www.usbreastfeeding.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Parental leave, State legislation

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Kimbro RT, Lynch SM, McLanahan S. 2004. The Hispanic paradox and breastfeeding: Does acculturation matter?—Evidence from the Fragile Families study. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University,Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 30 pp. (Working paper no. 04-01)

Annotation: This paper uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to test the hypothesis that (1) the Hispanic paradox extends to breastfeeding and (2) acculturation accounts for part of the paradox. The Hispanic paradox refers to the fact that Hispanics, especially recent immigrants, have remarkably good health outcomes given their low socioeconomic status and other classic risk factors. The paper provides background; discusses the data, variables, and methods; and includes results and a discussion. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures at the end of paper. The paper includes one appendix: results of pooled-sample logistic regression analyses predicting breastfeeding. References and footnotes are included.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Acculturation, Breastfeeding, Child health, Cultural factors, Economic factors, Families, Health behavior, Hispanic Americans, Immigrants, Low income groups, Racial factors, Risk factors

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Weimer DR. 2003. Summary of state breastfeeding laws. (Upd. ed.). Washington, DC: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, 18 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the various state laws concerning breastfeeding and briefly examines current legislative proposals concerning breastfeeding. The report includes a section for each state; each law is cited and is followed by a brief summary of its provisions. A comparative chart of existing state breastfeeding legislation is also included. The report includes footnotes.

Contact: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, 101 Independence Avenue, S.E., Washington, DC 20540-7500, Fax: Web Site: http://www.loc.gov/crsinfo Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, State legislation

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United States Breastfeeding Committee. 2002. Economic benefits of breastfeeding. Washington, DC: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses the impact of not breastfeeding infants on the short- and long-term health of the child, family economics, and future national economics due to higher costs for additional needed health services, loss of productivity in the workforce by parents and the child as an adult, and other strains on the national economy. It outlines programs of the federal government in supporting breastfeeding and what is needed to achieve national goal for increasing the incidence and duration of breastfeeding. References conclude the fact sheet. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 2025 M Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 367-1132 Fax: (202) 367-2132 E-mail: office@usbreastfeeding.org Web Site: http://www.usbreastfeeding.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Cost effectiveness, Costs, Infant health, Infant nutrition, National programs

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California Department of Public Health. Breastfeeding and healthy living: Resources for breastfeeding promotion among the African American community. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Public Health,

Annotation: This Web site hosts text, links, and multimedia resources on breastfeeding benefits, methods, myths and facts, as well as breastfeeding advocacy materials, materials for fathers, and links to similar organizations. Materials include brochures for families, a rap DVD and other videos available for purchase, and free videos and materials from the WIC program.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Sacramento, CA Telephone: (916) 558-1784 Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Audiovisual materials, Blacks, Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion programs, Consumer education materials, Infant nutrition, Infants, Information networks, Multimedia

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